PRESS

"The real showstopper was Mr. Green."

James R. Ostreich | The New York Times

Das Rheingold

Wiener Staatsoper

Wilhelm Sinkovicz

"As Fasolt, Ryan Speedo Green sings belcanto-like phrases  when cheering on the goddess Freia." 

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Semiramide

The Metropolitan Opera

Alex Ross

"The fast-rising bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green was stylish and stentorian as the high priest Oroe." 

Zachary Woolfe

"Ryan Speedo Green sounded fuller and more opulent as the high priest, Oroe."

David Wright

"Presiding over the whole drama, at beginning and end and at key moments along the way, was the imposing physical and vocal presence of bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green as the high priest Oroe."

David Salazar

"From his first moment onward, Ryan Speedo Green’s booming bass was simply a revelation. It’s a coarser sound, but it grabs you and holds your attention with its richness and size. Oroe is perhaps not a massive assignment, but he is slowly establishing his presence at the Met and will no doubt be a major star in years to come."

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Belshazzar's Feast

Boston Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood

Andrew L. Pincus

"Tovey had full command of the large performing forces, and Green was a booming narrator, issuing commandments like a prophet. If the chorus, spread out across the back of the Shed stage, wasn't always together, it hardly mattered, so fearful was the impact."

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Die Entführung aus dem Serail 

Houston Grand Opera

Sydney Boyd

"Bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green is both the opera’s standout star and least likable character as Osmin, Pasha Selim’s overseer and harem guard. From his first major aria—where he hog-ties Pedrillo and sings about how he’ll mangle, strangle, rip and tear him apart—he was a fantasy of sonorous, rumbling tone and accuracy. Green has mastered the trick of Mozart, who remains hands down the most adroit opera composer ever—you have to make something really difficult to sing effortlessly."

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A Singer’s Journey: From Solitary Confinement to the Met Opera

Michael Cooper

Michael Cooper

EXCERPT: "In his review in The New York Times, James R. Oestreich called Mr. Green “the real showstopper” and described his big moment — a fourth-act ode to a beloved overcoat he plans to pawn to help his friends — as “immensely touching.”

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La Bohème

The Metropolitan Opera

James Jorden

"But this performance will be remembered, I think, as the night of bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green’s breakthrough as a star. His full and distinctive voice made even the tiniest lines sound important, and his final act “Coat Aria” felt like the climax of the whole opera. I predict this artist, already mightily impressive, will soon be so essential he’ll be anchoring a Gesamtkunstwerk of his very own."

Zachary Woolfe

"Ryan Speedo Green sounded fuller and more opulent as the high priest, Oroe."

David Wright

"Presiding over the whole drama, at beginning and end and at key moments along the way, was the imposing physical and vocal presence of bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green as the high priest Oroe."

David Salazar

"From his first moment onward, Ryan Speedo Green’s booming bass was simply a revelation. It’s a coarser sound, but it grabs you and holds your attention with its richness and size. Oroe is perhaps not a massive assignment, but he is slowly establishing his presence at the Met and will no doubt be a major star in years to come."

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Carmen 

Opera San Antonio

David Hendricks

"The appearance of bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green as the toreador was a special treat for the San Antonio audience. Green recently became the hottest new arrival to the opera world thanks to a book, “Sing for Your Life: A Story of Race, Music and Family” by Daniel Bergner, which covers his Green’s troubled youth, some of it in detention because of a violent relationship with his abusive parents. Despite that, Green is achieving wild success in opera. His “Toreador Song” was delivered with anthem-like ardor and plenty of vibrato."

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Il Trovatore

L'Opéra de Lille

Christophe Rizoud

"Ryan Speedo Green en-captured an impressive Ferrando, the vigor of which includes his clever management of the grupetti in his first aria."

Sophie Bourdais

"Finally, we salute the bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green as Ferrando: a secondary role perhaps, but, from the opening, tremendously incarnate."

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Tosca

Boston Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood

Christophe Rizoud

"As Angelotti, Ryan Speedo Green sang with a rich, resonant bass voice."

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The Death of Klinghoffer

The Metropolitan Opera

Anthony Tommasini

"The bass-baritone Ryan Speedo Green, with his husky physique and robust voice, makes a menacing figure as the hijacker nicknamed Rambo." 

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Carmen

Wolf Trap Opera​

Tom Huizenga

"Captivating sounds came in smaller roles too, chiefly the Zuniga of Ryan Speedo Green. Once a juvenile delinquent, Green fell for opera at age 14 after seeing a Met production of “Carmen.” Now his career is rising. As the cocky lieutenant, Green used his cavernous bass voice with style and intelligence."

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l viaggio a Reims

Wolf Trap Opera​

Anne Midgette

"Ryan Speedo Green, who sang Don Profondo with a warm mien and sound, seems fully ready for a big career."

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Sing for Your Life

The New York Times​

Daniel Bergner

EXCERPT: "Ryan Speedo Green stands almost six-foot-five and weighs 300 pounds and wears size 17 shoes, and on a Sunday afternoon in March he was running in place and doing jumping jacks as he waited in the wings of the Metropolitan Opera for his turn to sing. It was the semifinals of the most important operatic voice competition in America, and Ryan was seized by such anxiety that he felt his massive body vanishing. Seventeen of the 22 singers left in the contest had gone before him..."

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